10 Most Breathtaking Space Images Captured in 2015

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As time passes by, people are given more knowledge and a clearer view of what lies outside the planet Earth. Because of the discoveries of professionals, we’ve stopped consulting our imaginations just to see what the universe looks like. Thanks also to movies like Star Wars: The Force Awakens and  The Martian, our curious minds have been fed.

But for a certified science geek and outer space buff, nothing is more fascinating than real space images, photos that are taken during a long-planned scientific exploration.

Marvel at some of these pictures below, all taken in 2015.

See videos at the end

Scott Kelly tweeted a photo while he was on the International Space Station

Since March 2015, Scott Kelly has been up with Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Korniyenko on the International Space Station (ISS). They’ll study the spaceflight’s long-term effects on the human body for a whole year.

So while he was busy conducting different experiments, he took a break and grabbed the chance to snap breathtaking images of his environment and uploaded them on Twitter.

Saturn’s tethys and rings

The Cassini spacecraft took this image of Saturn’s rings sitting behind Tethys, one of her moons, on August 18, 2015. With a simple monochrome effect in a visible light, the image was perfectly captured from 184,000 miles away.

Bloodstain-like streaks on Saturn’s moon

Bizarre streaks striking across the Tethys’s icy surface were captured in an image taken during the Cassini mission. The photo was made from numerous ultraviolet spectral-filtered images to expose subtle color wavelengths not visible to the naked eye.

Mars’s flowing water

In 2015, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) of NASA released a photo that proved Mars does have flowing water. It further proved that the planet is indeed capable of harboring life—one of the most important discoveries ever made. The streaks on the mountains indicate the path where the salty liquid water flows.

Comet gas outburst was captured by Rosetta

On July 29, 2015, this snapshot was taken by OSIRIS narrow-angle camera of Rosetta and showed a lasting gas outburst from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Rosetta is the first satellite to ever orbit around a comet. It is also the first space probe to travel alongside one when it was on its way toward the Sun’s direction.

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